Growth Mindset for Teachers

As a teacher you have a ton on your plate every day. You have planning, grading, meetings, parents to call back, students demanding attention… The list goes on and on. I get it. I was an English teacher for 3 years before I became a Gifted and Talented specialist. I remember the long days of grading, planning, and meetings that never really seem to matter. I also remember learning about “Growth Mindset” during my first year of teaching, (I was working on my Masters degree in Gifted Education) and thinking I really wanted to instill growth mindset into my students and tried to help them learn that not all mistakes are bad, that we can learn from them. I never thought about how to instill a growth mindset in my own work though.

As a gifted and talented specialist, I am continuously working on teaching my gifted students how to grow from mistakes or challenges they face at home or in school. I am also encouraging my teachers to work on this skill with all of their students, but the thought occurred to me- Why am I not teaching my teachers how to have a growth mindset? Our students watch our every move and if aren’t demonstrating a growth mindset, why would our students?

So after looking at a few different things and how to work with professionals on cultivating a growth mindset I found the same themes to help teachers work on their own growth mindset.

  1. Learn new technology
    1. Notice I say learn it, not master it. The point of growth mindset is to challenge yourself to get outside of your comfort zone and try  something new to learn from it. As teachers we do not need to be experts on up and coming technology, but we do need to keep up. Technology is going to be a big part of education for a long time.
    2. All I am asking is for you to learn how to use it, create with it, and integrate it into your lessons. If you get stuck, ask a kid to help or a fellow teacher who is familiar with it.
  2. Continuous growth
    1. As educators we need to be working on learning more about our content, teaching techniques, engagement strategies, classroom management, etc. in order to keep our license valid. In order to cultivate a growth mindset for your content or a concept you have been struggling with, you need to take those classes, attend those professional developments, sign up for a books study. I personally set up book studies at my school to help teachers learn something new and allow them to practice it with a growth mindset.
  3. Be Curious
    1. We teach our students to be inquisitive about the content, but when is the last time you let yourself ask questions about the content you are teaching? Use the strategies from inquiry-based learning in order to explore ways to teach new concepts or even old concepts students may be struggling with.
      1. Steps to take: Look at the problem, ask questions of the problem, explore the possible solutions through deep questioning.
  4. Flexibility
    1. As educators we know we have to make adjustments to lesson as the drop of a dime (or surprise fire drill), but when it comes to our own agenda, planning or grading we can be little stubborn. Ask a colleague to come in and watch a lesson or critique an assignment you are giving in order to grow your own practices and repertoire.
  5. Try something new
    1. It doesn’t have to be technology related.
    2. Maybe offer a menu of project choices that students can choose to complete for a summative assessment.
    3. Plan cross curricular with another department. Imagine how much fun a biology teacher and art teacher could have when learning about and drawing plants. History and Language Arts is always a great combination, but throw in some acting using historical context for character development and you have a unique project that meets a lot of standards. What about a math teacher and a music teacher working together to complete a class composition using different algebraic equations?
  6. Listen
    1. How often do we truly listen to what our teams are saying or suggesting? Really think about it. We are quick to interject and give our own thoughts without really hearing what our colleagues are saying or trying to get across.
      1. Slow down and open your mind to new ideas. (If it’s an old idea that didn’t work last time, think of ways to  tweak it to work now to meet the needs of students). This will help create a sense of community among peers who will feel heard and understood.
        1. How? Well to start, don’t interject the moment you hear something you disagree or agree with. Be in the moment with your peer- don’t start to think of a response, don’t let your mind or eyes wander- look and listen. Then collaborate.
  7. Reflect, Reflect, Reflect.
    1. Evaluate your work. What went well? What didn’t? How did the students respond? How did you respond? Was the outcome of the time spent what you wanted it to be?
      1. “I never have time to reflect, it’s always on to the next thing.” Yep I get it. I feel the same way. Possible solution? Talk to your department head and ask if you can take time on professional development days or professional learning committee to take time to reflect on the last few lessons you did.
      2. Why? Well if you know anything about growth mindset, we know that the brain is malleable meaning it can change. When we take the time to examine strengths, weaknesses, triumphs,  failures and goals- our brain can learn to adjust and it will keep you on track.

If you are able to implement a growth mindset and demonstrate to your students what it looks like they are likely to follow your lead. If anything, learning how to use the growth mindset in your own professional setting will help you become a stronger individual not only professionally, but also outside of work. These seven things will help you grow and change the way you look at problems, failures, successes, and changes across the board.

So what is the biggest thing you want to work? I would love to hear how you are going to incorporate growth mindset into your classroom, with your team, or with your own professional development.

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